How Do I Get Even, Bright Light for Photographing Pages From Books and Magazines?

How Do I Get Even, Bright Light for Photographing Pages From Books and Magazines? 1

The standard solution is to use two (or sometimes four) lights set at about 45 degree angles to the surface you are copying, and at a distance great enough that (a) there is not a huge degree of falloff or an obvious bright spot from either light; and (b) that the angle of the light at the surface closest to the light is not so high that you get direct reflection off of the paper into the camera. Something like this:Since you are working with books and periodicals, you will probably find that lighting from the top and bottom of the page, rather than the sides, will provide the fewest deleterious shadows, and that will likely mean shooting from the side of the page. The best orientation for shooting will probably not be the best orientation for reading. You may find that you get most even lighting using a pair of linear-tube fluorescent lamps or "banker" style long-filament incandescent bulbs. (If you are working with very glossy and textured originals, which is likely not the case here, then using polarizing gels on the lights and a polarizing filter in the opposite orientation on the lens will eliminate glare at the cost of significantly longer exposures.)As for getting the overall exposure right, it depends what exposure controls the camera provides. If you only have automatic exposure at your disposal, there may not be much you can do (apart from post processing) to fix things when the page does not meet your camera's expectations. You can try alternate "modes" on problem pages to see if that helps, since "text mode" will be working with some assumptions about how much of the page is covered with ink (typically 15% or so), and if the page is much different from what the camera is expecting (such as having much higher than normal ink coverage due to illustrations, etc.) you will get either overexposure or underexposure. (If you have manual control or some means of accessing exposure compensation, then you should have no problem.)

— — — — — —

tiger oscar turns gray when light is on why?

Oscars do not actually like bright light, they prefer to lurk in the shadows. As you wont be growing live plants in an Oscar tank the lighting is no critical. You may be able to remove one tube, or shade some of the lamp to reduce the brightness. Ian

How Do I Get Even, Bright Light for Photographing Pages From Books and Magazines? 2

— — — — — —

whish one is better to watch TV in dark room or under bright light? Why?

bright light cuz dak light is not healthy to your eyes

— — — — — —

How does a bat find its way even though they are blind?

They are not blind. They just do not see well in bright light. and they use sonar

— — — — — —

im in atl, ga and ever nite about dust its a bright light in the sky west and sometimes southwest of my house?

Given the amount of aircraft in the skies over Atlanta from the many airports in and around the city, I would say that would be the most likely culprit. An aircraft flying towards or away from you will cause its lights to appear almost stationary until it changes heading. It could also be lights from a construction crane. Of course, if it's a really big, bright light that gets redder and lower in elevation in the west to southwest horizon, and eventually disappears below it, odds are you are watching the sunset. :P

— — — — — —

Is it ok to look at the bright light of a scanner when it's scanning a picture? Any health problems?

it's either LED or Fluorescent. Not really a big issue. The Sun will do more damage than these types of lights

— — — — — —

Does anyone know where to get a bright light blanket?

did you check walmart ? my local grocery store carries all that stuff.

— — — — — —

So wierd question, I go outside in bright light. Come inside and everything is kind of tinted bluish greenish something happens when I look at red or bright colors also feel lightheaded too. Anyone know what this is?

The way that your cones in your eye work is that when you receive light, some of the pigment is used up and more has to be made. At lower light levels, more can be made as fast as it is used up.In bright light, you start to run a deficit. When you get inside, your eyes are working overtime to replace the used pigments. Since red-sensitive pigments get used more quickly, you tend to be red-deficit for a while after being exposed to sunshine. It's a little different for different people. I often feel like things look reddish when I come indoors.You may be familiar with this. Stare at the weirdly colored flag for a minute and then look at a white part of the screen. The same principle is at work here.Hack Your Brain: The McCollough EffectMy answer does not necessarily reflect the views of the Boeing Company or the US Department of Defense and is intended for informational purposes only. So wierd question, I go outside in bright light. Come inside and everything is kind of tinted bluish greenish something happens when I look at red or bright colors also feel lightheaded too. Anyone know what this is?

bright light related articles
If I Direct the Camera on My Phone at a Bright Light, Will It Damage the Camera?
Whats the Name/brand of the Self Defence Weapon That Emits Bright Light?
The Power of Light
YouTube Video Shows Luminous 'UFO' Light Up the Sky in ...
How Do I Properly Expose Dark Scenes Containing Bright Light Sources?

Copyright © 2020 Coffee bag - Guangzhou tianci packaging industry Co,. Ltd. | Sitemap