How to Delete a Video After It Has Been Watched Completely?

How to delete a video after it has been watched completely?

How to Delete a Video After It Has Been Watched Completely? 1

You might want to install the package mplayer-resumer. This will allow you to resume a video from where you left off. When you are done watching the videos using this wrapper script, you can then safely delete them. excerpt from main site on rationale.

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In this scene what are the names of the kind of workers and the object they are propeling?

That is a handcar, specifically one with a pump. Here's a video about how one works.It would normally be operated by railroad employees, but in that specific video they appear to be police officers, or potentially private railroad security

How to Delete a Video After It Has Been Watched Completely? 2

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I'm lonely and depressed, Say something to make me laugh?

I ran into a glass wall the other day, I cracked the glass, and my friend was right there with a video camera because we were working a video and she got it all and is going to put it on youtube soon and I have a bump on my forehead that is the size of a soft ball. I also ended up being late for work and my boss just laughed at me when she saw the video because my friend works with me and showed our boss

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Can you embed video into a wufoo form?

Looking to add videos to your form? Try Polydojo.That's too much work:Dabbling with HTML or setting up complicated Zapier integrations seems like too much work just to add a video to a form.Just copy-paste:Polydojo includes a special field for embedding Youtube videos into your forms. All you need to do is copy-paste the video URL. That's it.And there's more!Apart from videos, Polydojo also makes it easy to add images, signature boxes, tabular input grids, hidden inputs, calculations and more!Yep. I'm biased:Now, as the founder of Polydojo, I'm likely biased. But doesn't HTML-editing seem like too much work? Wouldn't you prefer URL-copy-pasting?Why not try it out for free?Can you embed video into a wufoo form?

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What should my history video be about?

LOL. Military was all that Sparta had. Seriously. No matter how long and hard you research it (like I did when I was assigned to something like this 3 years ago)...that's what it comes down to. But that's not a bad thing. Military was very important in that time, and Sparta had the best. They were also probably the most stubborn city-state at the time, so they were good at getting what they wanted :D If you REALLY, REALLY CANNOT do military, just find the weak points in Athens. Remember, Athens vs Sparta is like Brains vs Brawn. You can make togas for your project :D Make some out of bedsheets. There are A MILLION ideas for a video. You can make a little fake news report and have a debate (Like, a parody of the current Republican primaries...make a little Athens vs Sparta election), straight out demonstrate how weak Athens was and how strong Sparta was,etc.

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Video archiving

For long-term preservation of digital video sustainable container formats as well as audio/video codecs are necessary. There is no consensus to date among the archival community as to which file format or codecs should be used for preservation purposes for digital video. The previously proclaimed encodings were Motion JPEG 2000 (lossless) and uncompressed video. FFV1 has turned out to be a viable addition to that choice and was added as a suitable option for preservation encoding in 2014. With compression ratios comparable to JPEG 2000 lossless and its lower computing requirements, it is already being used by professional archives as their long-term storage codec. Especially archives where the collections do not feature extensive broadcast materials but rather consist of, oral history-, ethnographic-recordings and the likes, "favored the lossless FFV1 encoding" in communications with the "Federal Agencies Digitization Guidelines Initiative" (FADGI) team. As of 2015, standardization of FFV1 through the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) is work in progress as part of the European PREFORMA Project, as well as implementation of a conformance checker for FFV1/PCM in a Matroska (MKV) container. Details of FFV1's standardization plan have been prepared by MediaArea (authors of MediaInfo) as part of their conformance checking tool "Media CONCH". It is also listed as a format option for long-term preservation of moving images on sites of the U.S. Library of Congress', State Records NSW and others. The Society of American Archivists has published a paper in August 2014, suggesting only FFV1 as preservation codec for video. The Digital Preservation project at the U.S. Library of Congress identified AVI and Matroska as common container formats for FFV1. List of institutions known to use FFV1AustriaAustrian Museum of Modern Art (MuMoK): For their collection of art videos. Danube University Krems (Lower Austria/Niedersterreich) Filmarchiv Austria (Austrian Film Archive): For their telecined DigiBeta copies of some films. Landesmuseum Niedersterreich [de] (State Museum of Lower Austria) sterreichische Mediathek (Austria's national audio/video archive)AustraliaMuseum VictoriaCanadaCity of Vancouver Archives Muse d'art contemporain de MontralFranceCinmathque FranaiseGermanySMIDAK FilmproduktionIrelandIrish Film InstituteSlovakiaRTV SlovakiaSloveniaRTV SlovenijaSwitzerlandAV Preservation by reto.ch HTW Chur Archives de la Ville de LausanneUnited Arab EmiratesSharjah Media Corporation (SMC).United KingdomThe National Archives (United Kingdom) The Media Archive for Central England BFI National Archive (the UK's national moving image archive)United StatesCity University of New York Television (CUNY TV) National Library of Medicine (Washington DC) University of Notre Dame Archives University of Texas Libraries (FFV1 in MKV for DVD preservation) Indiana University New York Public Library University of Georgia, Walter J. Brown Media ArchivesDevelopment and improvementsThe "sterreichische Mediathek" has also developed DVA-Profession a Free Software solution for archive-suitable mass video digitization, mainly using FFV1 as video encoding throughout the whole workflow, without transcoding. Additionally, they have initiated the development of "FFV1.3" (=version 3 of FFV1) together with Michael Niedermayer (FFmpeg), Peter Bubestinger and Dave Rice. FFV1.3 contains improvements and new features such as support for multi-threaded encoding/decoding, error resilience and integrity validation by CRC checksums, storing of display aspect ratio (DAR) and field order. It was tested for over 1 year, and officially released stable for production in August 2013. In August 2016, support for 48bit/16bpc (=bits per component) in RGB was added. Before that, 16bpc in FFV1 were only supported in YCbCr and RGB was limited to 14bpc. Suitable as preservation codecWithin the video archiving domain, the interest in FFV1 is increasing, as can be seen in a thread on the AMIA-L mailing list, the PrestoCentre Forum or the Archivematica mailing list. Companies are also picking up FFV1 support. For example, NOA (formerly "NOA Audio Solutions"), announced support for the FFV1 in their product line in July 2013 and KEM-Studiotechnik released a film-scanner with FFV1 output in November 2013. In an interview for The New York Times magazine about "Tips on Archiving Family History", Bertram Lyons from the U.S. Library of Congress says: "[...] for video, there are many choices when it comes to codecs (the way the bits are encoded/decoded to represent the visual data, e.g., ffv1, H.264, Apple ProRes) [...]" In January 2013, the possible use and adoption of FFV1 as an archiving codec was addressed in the issue of PrestoCentre's AV Insider magazine: "FFV1 has many beneficial technical features [...], but adoption rates are relatively low compared with alternatives, for example JPEG2000. [...] But holding back too long only serves to self-perpetuate the status of FFV1. The adoption by Archivematica and the Austrian Mediathek with their active promotion of FFV1 along with others may start to break this vicious circle. This could lead to a virtuous circle of wider take-up, to shared development, to incorporation into commercial products and a host of other benefits for the community." PACKED - the "Centre of Expertise in Digital Heritage" in Belgium, say in an article about video formats for archiving: "When removing the proprietary codecs from this list, only a few are left. [...] This basically leaves heritage institutions that want to use a lossless codec, with only two options: Jpeg2000 and FFV1." In 2015, the International Federation of Television Archives (FIAT/IFTA) mentioned FFV1 explicitly in their call-for-presentations for their annual World Conference, asking "Is FFV1 the new JPEG2000"?. A workshop titled "FFV1 for Preservation" is also featured.

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fun things to do when stuck at home??Go for a run. paint your nails. call a friend. walk you dog or cat i guess. ummm make a video and put it on you tube— — — — — —VideoBy 1982, most pornographic films were being shot on the cheaper and more convenient medium of videotape. The technology change happened quickly and completely when directors realised that continuing to shoot on film was no longer a profitable option. This change moved the films out of the cinemas and into people's private homes. This was the end of the age of big budget productions and the mainstreaming of pornography. It soon went back to its earthy roots and expanded to cover every fetish possible since filming was now so inexpensive. Instead of hundreds of pornographic films being made each year, thousands now were, including compilations of just the sex scenes from various videos. The 1977 softcore sex comedy film Come Play with Me, which had been highly successful commercially at the cinema, became one of the first British films to sell in large numbers on the new VHS format. In 1979 Paul Raymond launched the Electric Blue series of softcore videos, a range which was produced until the mid 1990s. They were an extension of his magazine publishing into new media. An Electric Blue special VHS video, A Night at the Revuebar (1983), included extensive footage of the 1980s version of The Festival of Erotica show from the Raymond Revuebar. Meanwhile, in the early eighties John Lindsay began selling compilations of his hardcore films on video through mail order, taking advantage of the then unregulated state of the British video industry. Another director to take advantage of this unregulated period was Mike Freeman, who in 1979 set up the hardcore video production company Videx Ltd. and employed Lindsay Honey as an actor. Honey went on run his own mail order hardcore video business with his partner Linzi Drew until the pair were convicted in 1992. During the 1990s and 2000s, Honey used the name Ben Dover to produce and direct gonzo pornography videos. Another successful producer of pornographic videos at this time was Viv Thomas. He began producing pornographic videos in the 1980s, moving into producing hardcore material exclusively once doing so became legal in 1999. Thomas has become known as an established producer of lesbian pornography and with a reputation for producing artistic pornographic films with an emphasis on high production values. Female directors include Tanya Hyde, who began as a hardcore actor in the mid-90s and since 2004 has been a prolific director of hardcore fetish titles for the British pornographic film production company Harmony Films. The Video Recordings Act 1984 (VRA) required the BBFC to censor all video works before release. Under the act, almost all video recordings must be classified by an authority chosen by the Home Secretary. This classification is then legally binding. Since the introduction of the Act, the BBFC has been the chosen authority. Since films not rated by the BBFC cannot be distributed as videos or DVDs, lack of BBFC approval generally makes productions of such films uneconomic. After 1984 videotape sellers were more likely to be prosecuted under the VRA rather than the Obscene Publications Act. The VRA requires that all videos must have a certificate from the BBFC. If the BBFC refuses a certificate a video is effectively banned for home viewing, but not necessarily in the cinema. As a result, the UK became one of the few democratic countries where the sale of explicit pornography on video (and later DVD) was illegal. Home videotape was a booming market and it was relatively simple for individuals to smuggle hardcore material in from Europe or the United States, where it had been purchased legally, either for personal use or to copy it for distribution. This resulted in a considerable black market of poor quality videotapes. While the authorities did their best to stay on top of illegal pornography they found that juries, while not particularly liking the material, were reluctant to convict defendants where the material was intended for private use among consenting adults. Finally, in 2000, following the dismissal of a test case brought by the BBFC, hardcore pornography was effectively legalised, subject to certain conditions and licensing restrictions. It is still an offence to sell obscene material by mail order. BBFC guidelines have subsequently been relaxed to allow the limited distribution of hardcore pornography under an R18 certificate. This is intended to provide a classification for works that are within Obscene Publications Act 1959, but exceed what the BBFC considers acceptable for its 18 certificate. Anything deemed likely to contravene the Act is prohibited from DVDs awarded an R18 certificate. A list of the categories of material most commonly prosecuted under the Act is published by the Crown Prosecution Service. In practice, this means that the R18 certificate is mainly used for hardcore pornography. The BBFC continues to demand cuts of any material it believes breaches the provisions of the Obscene Publications Act or any other legislation. In 2009, 2% of cinema films had material cut, and 3.6% of videos. Most cuts occur in videos rated for 18 or R18, rather than videos intended for viewing by under-18s. In 2009, 16.8% of 18 videos, and 27.3% of R18 videos, had material cut.
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