GTA Like 19 Century Games?

GTA like 19 century games?

red dead redemption (set in 1911) la noire (set in 1945)

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PRNDL display out on Buick Century?

the display is probably shot.the best place is a auto parts salvage yard.if they do not have one they are all connected by computer and can get you one

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if i was in the 16th century?

If your avatar is true you are a woman. So you could not have been a Jesuit. And if you had been a Jesuit in Germany you would probably have had a rough time. As to why become one, that's a question of faith I suppose as the Jesuits did not become powerful enough to affect politics until the 17th century.

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What was invented in the twentieth century?

A whole bunch of stuff that we now take for granted.For example the two most successful theories in physics, Special and General Relativity, and formulations of quantum mechanics; the Atomic and hydrogen bombs, the transistor, modern computers, multiple vaccines, many transuranic elements, and far too many other items to list.Robert's Rules for Quora:I start with the assumption that Quora is not used as a peer review site by those in the sciences. However, I appreciate those professionals and serious hobbyists in the sciences who take the time to answer some of the questions.My answers are intentionally written in as simple language as I can use, to permit understanding by the widest audience. Wherever possible I avoid the use of equations. I try to avoid writing answers that are already well covered by others, although from time to time I will contribute my two cents when I feel I can add clarity.Sometimes I get the sense that the questioner is seeking help with their homework. Many of these questions involve calculations easily done by the questioner. I avoid responding to these. Last, be wary of my odd sense of humor; spacetime is not the only thing that may be warped.rnkWhat was invented in the twentieth century?

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What do century eggs taste like?

NO!!! they are not as horrible as they seem. My ma has always cooked century egg and sliced pork congee since i was a kid and i loved it. Also, there's this myth about these egss being made from horse pee, well, that is not true. If you can get past the rather creamy texture of the egg and the fact that the white is like jelly that springs backs when touched and has little taste, i am sure you will (or maybe not?) enjoy it if you taste it!

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Why was the late nineteenth century and the early twentieth century such a time of rapid scientific development?

This was due to the Second Industrial Revolution, also known as the Technological Revolution, which was a phase of rapid industrialization in the final third of the 19th century and the beginning of the 20th. By the middle of the 19th century there was a scientific understanding of chemistry and a fundamental understanding of thermodynamics and by the last quarter of the century both of these sciences were near their present-day basic form. Thermodynamic principles were used in the development of physical chemistry. Understanding chemistry greatly aided the development of basic inorganic chemical manufacturing and the aniline dye industries

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How good is Century for Boxing and MMA?

Century Boxing Equipment

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What was the worst period for fashion in the last century?

This is purely a matter of individual taste. I myself would choose either the 1920s or the 1970s. The 1920s featured among women deliberately defeminizing styles with low waistlines that disguised feminine curves, often called for binding of the breasts, cut short long hair, and, in short, did their best to make women look like teen-aged boys (it has been theorized that this was in part done out of nostalgia for all the young men lost in World War I); among men, it featured loosely tailored suits and exaggerated styles such as the idiotic "Oxford bags" (which were basically trousers cut several sizes too large). The 1970s (which really consists in this sense of ca. 1967-ca. 1975) brought in the renunciation of formal clothing almost altogether and the ubiquitous T-shirt and jeans which enforced conformity upon its millions of sloppy wearers; at the same time there was a deliberate rejection of personal hygiene in favor of "natural" styles of not washing and shaving, leading to greasy skin and hair and unkempt locks. (Naturally, there were exceptions to both, and some beautiful styles appeared in both decades, but these were, in my opinion, the worst trends to appear in the 20th century. ).

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Gorgopas (4th Century BC)
Gorgopas (4th Century BC)
Gorgopas was a Spartan commander during the Corinthian War. In 388 BC Hierax was dispatched by Sparta to Aegina to take over the Spartan fleet. The Spartans under the command of Teleutias had earlier driven off the Athenian fleet blockading Aegina. Soon after taking over, Hierax departed for Rhodes with most of the fleet leaving Gorgopas, his vice-admiral with twelve triremes as governor in Aegina, replacing Eteonicus who held the post before. Gorgopas continued operations against the Athenian army led by Pamphilius who was still laying siege to the city. He ultimately forced Athens to send ships to evacuate their land forces from the area. Gorgopas then went on to harass the Athenian territory from his base in Aegina. Not long afterwards, Gorgopas took his fleet to Ephesus to escort Antalcidas who was sent to replace Hierax as admiral. Upon completing his mission, on the way back to Aegina he encountered the Athenian fleet under Eunomus. Gorgopas retreated and was able to make it back to the port in Aegina. After unsuccessfully trying to bait Gorgopas to come out and fight, the Athenians sailed away at night fall. The lead Athenian ship carried a customary light which the other ships could follow. Gorgopas, keeping his ships dark, followed the light of the Athenian ship. He was able to surprise the Athenian fleet as it passed close to shore around Cape Zoster. The Spartans captured four triremes and forced the rest of the Athenian ships to retreat to Piraeus. Gorgopas was killed in an ambush later that year. One Athenian unit under Chabrias lay in ambush while another under Demaenetus drew Gorgopas out of Aegina and into the trap by openly marching through the area.• Other Related Knowledge ofthe 4th century bc— — — — — —First literature of Odisha (4th century BC)The ancientness of the Odia literature is being proved from its soil which says about two types of literature from very beginning. The creativity, development and preservation of Odia language and literature through ages can be seen in its spoken (in the form of folk lores) and written forms (e.g. rock edicts, manuscripts). The songs sung after birth, death, while working, and during festivals have helped to preserve the language in the first way (i.e. spoken form) by getting transferred through generations, while, the stories painted in cave paintings have constituted preservation in the second way (i.e. written form). The inhabitants of this land started to drown this language about 15,000 years ago. The Gudahandi painting of Kalahandi district and the cave art of Khandagiri and Udayagiri are the great achievements of this primitive architecture. Kharavela's Hatigumpha inscription serves as evidence of past Odia cultural, political, ritual, and social status and is the 1st poetic stake inscription. Though Ashoka had created many rock edicts and inscriptions before Kharavela, yet his instructions for administration have been written in a rude and chocked language. On the other hand, the Hatigumpha inscription shows the flexibility of the language in a sweet flow. Main feature of this inscription was based on principles of Sanskrit poetic structure: such as- Sadvanshah kshyatriya b pi dhiirodttah gunanwith I Ekabanshodva bhuph kulaj bahabo pi J II Shrungarabirashantnmekoangirasa ishyate I Angni sarbe
The Eighteenth-Century Records of the Boston Overseers of the Poor
The Eighteenth-Century Records of the Boston Overseers of the Poor
The Eighteenth-Century Records of the Boston Overseers of the PoorIn 2007, The Eighteenth-Century Records of the Boston Overseers of the Poor was published by the Colonial Society of Massachusetts. Edited by Eric G. Nellis and Anne Decker, it is based on manuscript records of the Boston Overseers of the Poor which the Massachusetts Historical Society obtained from the City of Boston in 1957. The Colonial Society asked Eastman and McGrath to create a vehicle that would make the content of the book of interest for high school students and spark student investigations. Eastman and McGrath created a web-based project on digitized key areas of the Boston Overseers of the Poor records. It includes student workbook questions for each of the components. They converted the records into a searchable database including over 1100 children who were 'bound out' (apprenticed) from 1756 to 1806, including names, ages, gender, town, master/mistress, and trade. An interactive map includes the adopted locations of the children in Massachusetts and Maine (which was part of Massachusetts until 1820). Other components include: Various legislative acts regarding the poor, A list of all Boston Overseers of the Poor from 1690 to 1800, Digitized child indenture contracts, A 1756 almshouse census and inventory, A searchable database of "Black, Mulatto and Foreign-Born Poorhouse Admissions: 1775-1800", and A searchable database of Almshouse admissions from November 1758 to September 1788.— — — — — —Eighteenth-Century FictionEighteenth-Century Fiction is a quarterly peer-reviewed academic journal dedicated to the critical and historical investigation of literature and culture of the period 1660-1832. It is published by the University of Toronto Press.— — — — — —Eighteenth-century Brattle Street and "Tory Row"During the 18th century, seven mansions were built along the main road to Watertown (which included not only the modern Brattle Street but also what is now Elmwood Avenue). Because many of their owners were Loyalists during the American Revolution, these houses got the nickname "Tory Row". During and after the Revolution, many were confiscated by George Washington's army. Some of these were, however, later restored to the families of their former owners. Even as the Tory Row mansions were being built, however, the forest remained a nearby presence in Cambridge. As late as 1759, a Harvard student writing home reported "many bears killed at Cambridge and the neighboring towns about this time, and several persons killed by them." In the same year, 1759, the house at 105 Brattle Street was built, of which more below. Provincial militia leader William Brattle, at one time the wealthiest man in the Massachusetts Bay Colony, is thought to be the Brattle for whom the street was named. He had the house at 42 Brattle Street built for him in 1727. Brattle tried to keep peace between patriots and the British, but after the 1774 incident known as the Powder Alarm, an angry mob surrounded his house and forced him to flee. The Baroness Riedesel, whose husband commanded the Brunswick regiments that supported the British, spent much of the wartime "imprisoned" at 149 Brattle Street, the old Tory Row mansion now commonly called the Lechmere-Sewall-Riedesel House. She has left a charming painting in words of the Tory society on Brattle Street before the Revolution came: "Never had I chanced upon such an agreeable situation. Seven families, who were connected with each other, partly by the ties of relationship and partly by affection, had here farms, gardens, and magnificent houses, and, not far off, plantations of fruit. The owners of these were in the habit of daily meeting each other in the afternoons, now at the house of one and now at another, and making themselves merry with music and the dance,- living in prosperity, united and happy, until, alas! this ruinous war separated them, and left all their houses desolate, except two, the proprietors of which were also soon obliged to flee."— — — — — —Eighteenth-century DelavalsThe eighteenth-century Delavals of Seaton were: Admiral George Delaval (1660-1723) Captain Francis Blake Delaval (1692-1752) Sir Francis Blake Delaval (1727-1771) Lord John Hussey Delaval (1728-1808) Edward Hussey Delaval (1729-1814)Lady Rhoda Delaval Astley, the daughter of Captain Francis Blake Delaval and sister of Sir Francis Blake Delaval, was an artist who painted Delaval family members. Many of the paintings are in the National Trust and located at Seaton Delaval Hall, which descended into the Astley line through her son Jacob.
Early Eighteenth Century
Early Eighteenth Century
Early eighteenth centuryVernacular revivalAfter the Union in 1707 and the shift of political power to England, the use of Scots was discouraged by many in authority and education. Nevertheless, Scots remained the vernacular of many rural communities and the growing number of urban working-class Scots. Literature developed a distinct national identity and began to enjoy an international reputation. Allan Ramsay (1686-1758) was considered the most important literary figure of the era, often described as leading a "vernacular revival". He laid the foundations of a reawakening of interest in older Scottish literature, publishing The Ever Green (1724), a collection that included many major poetic works of the Stewart period. He led the trend for pastoral poetry, helping to develop the Habbie stanza, which would be later be used by Robert Burns as a poetic form. His Tea-Table Miscellany (1724-37) contained poems old Scots folk material, his own poems in the folk style and "gentilizings" of Scots poems in the English neo-classical style. His pastoral opera The Gentle Shepherd was one of the most influential works of the era. He would also play a leading role in supporting drama in Scotland and the attempt to found a permanent theatre in the capital. Verse and proseRamsay was part of a community of poets working in Scots and English. These included William Hamilton of Gilbertfield (c. 1665-1751), Robert Crawford (1695-1733), Alexander Ross (1699-1784), the Jacobite William Hamilton of Bangour (1704-54), socialite Alison Rutherford Cockburn (1712-94), and poet and playwright James Thompson's (1700-48), most famous for the nature poetry of his Seasons. Tobias Smollett (1721-71) was a poet, essayist, satirist and playwright, but is best known for his picaresque novels, such as The Adventures of Roderick Random (1748) and The Adventures of Peregrine Pickle (1751) for which he is often seen as Scotland's first novelist. His work would be a major influence on later novelists such as Thackeray and Dickens. The early eighteenth century was also a period of innovation in Gaelic vernacular poetry. Major figures included Rob Donn Mackay (1714-78) and Donnchadh Bn Mac an t-Saoir (Duncan Ban MacIntyre) (1724-1812). The most significant figure in the tradition was Alasdair mac Mhaighstir Alasdair (Alasdair MacDonald) (c. 1698-1770). His interest in traditional forms can be seen in his most significant poem Clanranald's Gallery. He also mixed these traditions with influences from the Lowlands, including Thompson's Seasons, which helped inspire a new form of nature poetry in Gaelic, which was not focused on their relations to human concerns. DramaDrama was pursued by Scottish playwrights in London such as Catherine Trotter (1679-1749), born in London to Scottish parents and later moving to Aberdeen. Her plays and included the verse-tragedy Fatal Friendship (1698), the comedy Love at a Loss (1700) and the history The Revolution in Sweden (1706). David Crawford's (1665-1726) plays included the Restoration comedies Courtship A-la-Mode (1700) and Love at First Sight (1704). These developed the character of the stage Scot, often a clown, but cunning and loyal. Newburgh Hamilton (1691-1761), born in Ireland of Scottish descent, produced the comedies The Petticoat-Ploter (1712) and The Doating Lovers or The Libertine (1715). He later wrote the libretto for Handel's Samson (1743), closely based on John Milton's Samson Agonistes. James Thompson's plays often dealt with the contest between public duty and private feelings, included Sophonisba (1730), Agamemnon (1738) and Tancrid and Sigismuda (1745), the last of which was an international success. David Mallet's (c. 1705-65) Eurydice (1731) was accused of being a coded Jacobite play and his later work indicates opposition to the Walpole administration. The opera Masque of Alfred (1740) was a collaboration between Thompson, Mallet and composer Thomas Arne, with Thompson supplying the lyrics for his most famous work, the patriotic song Rule, Britannia! In Scotland a troop of English players came to Edinburgh in 1715 where they performed Macbeth and a series of Restoration comedies, but they soon left, perhaps because of objections from local kirk presbyteries. By 1725 English actor Anthony Aston, a friend of Ramsay, was performing in Edinburgh, but seems to have fallen foul of the Scottish Master of the Revels, who licensed plays, companies and playhouses, and soon left. In 1727 the Kirk attacked theatres as immoral in the Admonition and Exhortation. The Edinburgh Company of Players were able to perform in Dundee, Montrose, Aberdeen and regular performances at the Taylor's Hall in Edinburgh under the protection of a Royal Patent. Ramsay was instrumental in establishing them in a small theatre in Carruber's Close in Edinburgh, but the passing of the 1737 Licensing Act made their activities illegal and the theatre soon closed. A new theatre was opened at Cannongate in 1747 and operated without a licence into the 1760s.
Twenty-first  Century
Twenty-first Century
Twenty-first centuryPresently there is a healthy lumber economy in the United States, directly employing about 500,000 people in three industries: Logging, Sawmill, and Panel. Annual production in the U.S. is more than 30 billion board feet making the U.S. the largest producer and consumer of lumber. Despite advances in technology and safety awareness, the lumber industry remains one of the most hazardous industries in the world. While challenges in today's market exist, the United States remains the second largest exporter of wood in the world. Its primary markets are Japan, Mexico, Germany, and the United Kingdom. Due to higher labor costs in the United States, it is common practice for raw materials to be exported, converted into finished goods and imported back into the United States. For this reason, more raw goods including logs and pulpwood chip are exported than imported in the United States, while finished goods like lumber, plywood and veneer, and panel products have higher imports than exports in the U.S. Recently there has been a resurgence in logging towns in the United States. This has been due in large part to the housing recovery.— — — — — —Are employee unions obsolete in twenty first century America?Fewer people are in unions today than before, but they are by no means obsolete.Mostly, they take the form of government workers-and this is part of the reason Republicans hate government jobs so much.But teacher's unions in West Virginia and Oklahoma have scored real, desperately-needed victories for their members, which were bringing in poverty-level wages.— — — — — —How many New Testament Manuscripts do we have from the period between the first century and the fourth century?You ask about the first four centuries, until about 400 AD. I am inclined to initially answer through 300 AD, because I believe that period is more important for historical* reasons.This page on Wikipedia lists the 130 papyri of the New Testament that we know of, together with what content each has. For our purposes, we need to sort each of the three tables by date, then count the early ones. Be careful counting, because the same papyrus may appear multiple times in the table.I count 27 in the first table, 19 in the second, and 22 in the third. The total number of NT papyri in the first three centuries is then about 68.Very few codices (the other types of manuscripts) were written by AD 300 as far as I know, so that should be close to the total count for all manuscripts.Another web page has a similar table, but in date order. The result was different, but in the ballpark. On that site, I count:Manuscripts up to 300 AD: 56 (53 papyri and 3 uncials)Manuscripts up to 400 AD: 102 (the "versions" are not in Greek)*About 300 AD, the Emperor Diocletian severely persecuted the Christian church, and probably destroyed a large percentage of the Bible manuscripts extant at that time. There have been disputes whether the best or worst manuscripts were destroyed, and how the Church chose to replace them later. Apparently there was a single order for fifty copies of the Bible later, paid for by the Emperor Constantine if I remember right. Some have suggested changes were deliberately made in those copies— — — — — —What are some lies told about Jesus and first century Christians?In the reality of life there are only two sides, Gods team, and Satan's team. No mater what one may clam to be he is ether on Gods team are Satan's, there is no other team or side. There are many lies about early Christians and Jesus and Gods church. The doctrine that one could be excommunicated out of the church and you would go to hell. in, 246AD. The veneration of angels and dead saints, in 381AD. The worship of Mary as the mother of God in 431AD. The doctrine of Purgatory in 593 AD. Prayer to Mary and to dead saints in 600AD. The pagan origin of pope, or universal bishop around 600AD. The temporal power of the pope in 750AD. Jesus expressly forbade it, such things are for himself alone. Worship of the cross, images, and relics started in 787 AD. Holy water in 850AD. There are many, Hearsay's Let the Word of God be true and Jesus Lord of Lords and King of Kings. My Lord and saviour. Immanuel.
What Was European Nobility Life Like During the 18th Century?
What Was European Nobility Life Like During the 18th Century?
What was European nobility life like during the 18th Century?Well, if the nobleman was the owner of an estate, he would not do any kind of job. He would derive his income from his estate -that is from rent paid by tenants, produce grown on his lands etc. Some noblemen spent a lot of time at court, in attendance on the monarch. Younger sons of the nobility might live on an allowance paid by the head of the family, or sometimes they went into the army, the navy, or the church (these were the only occupations considered suitable for a gentleman). Daughters of the nobility normally stayed at home until they married. In Catholic countries, some noble girls might become nuns. Hunting was a popular occupation with the nobility, as was gambling. They would attend balls and enjoy dancing. They enjoyed going to the theatre and the opera. At home, they would read, play cards or board games, and write many letters (people kept up lengthy correspondence with friends and relatives). Some nobles had intellectual interests, and wrote or dabbled in science or philosophy. Many English nobles became interested in new farming methods during the 18th century, and experimented on their estates with crop rotation, breeding better cattle and sheep etc. Meals in the 18th century tended to be large for the well off, dinner, the main meal of the day, would consist of several courses, with several different choices of dish in each course. Some very popular dishes in England in the 18th century included roasts of various kinds (lamb, beef, goose, chicken, pheasant,duck) pies of various kinds (veal, mutton, pigeon, pork, goose,duck, eel) stewed eels, boiled pike or carp, salmagundy (made with minced chicken, veal, anchovies and lemon), fricasees, lemon or orange tarts, cheesecakes, syllabub, floating island (made with cream, sugar, wine, lemon, currant jelly and French rolls). The owner of an estate would have a large house on his estate, and some nobles owned more than one estate and might have more than one home. They might also have a house in town, in order to enjoy the pleasures of town life: balls, theatres, etc. Noble couples often had large families. Women of the nobility were likely to have their babies fed by wetnurses (being a wetnurse was a common way for a poor woman to earn a living). This meant that they were likely to get pregnant again quite quickly.— — — — — —what does basketmaker's ahop looks like back in 18th century?It would be small, usually located proximal to the blacksmith. It would generally be a wooden rafted structure with beams from which the cooper could hang bushels of rushes for drying. Finished baskets could also be hung in this manner. On the main floor would be storage, display, and work areas. In addition to raw materials and baskets in different stages of completion the tools of the trade would also be seen on this level. These would include an axe, wedges, and knives. Above would be a loft area for sleeping and more storage— — — — — —What was common men's clothing in the late 18th century?Indian culture is always favourite since the civilization of the world begins and till yet the clothes of India supreme than any country of the world. The clothing has been rooted from India, diffrent types of clothes are created in India. Vanaras, Maharastra, Assam is the main state prouduces the clothes. But I dont know the total world view, but some countries are very much good in the same. 19th Century keeps India a new development in clothing and now the result is touching us, We are proud that India is the main rooter of clothing and having so much attractives clothes in the new era— — — — — —Even in 18th century, Indian women favored comfort over cover. But now even above 40u00b0C we Indians cover ourselves as much as possible. How can we go back to the apparel freedom women had in antiquity? How can we remove the false concept of "shame"?Customs and traditions evolve over time.In ancient India, most women wore clothes that required them to bare their upper torso. It was a cultural practice in those times, and to cover themselves head to toe was considered a crime by their own community.In the years that followed, things have changed, and new practices have overshadowed the old ones (unintentionally, for the better). In some parts of Kerala, the upper caste women were permitted to cover their upper torso, while the lower caste women had to do without full-body clothing as a means of caste distinction and torture. Similarly, the concept of covering up the whole body also materialized and unfolded gradually with the Rajput traditions.This was not done out of "shame". This was done to protect their own body from alien invasions. Besides, I would want to know what do you precisely mean by "false concept of shame"? If you are of the opinion that body cover exists only due to the emergence of the concept of "shame", then you are mistaken. Everything has a reason. A human body already is an abode of millions of micro-organisms that live on it, feed on it, reproduce on it and proliferate. A human body is prone to various diseases if exposed to harmful elements present around it. Therefore, it needs a protective shield, a cover, to save itself from environmental toxicity.To make things more clear about "women", since that is your prime concern here, a lot of people complain about women wearing a bra, and feel the need to discard it, but a woman needs to wear a bra because the breasts are prone to getting saggy, becomes difficult to walk due to its weight, and also is not sexually appealing to a lot of men. A woman needs to wear a panty because the human vagina is a vulnerable spot and can easily get infected even from mere environmental pollution. At 40 degree celsius, harmful radiations from the Sun can cause skin cancer, and the perennial dust can affect the skin and cause allergies. At 40 degree celsius, both men and women need to cover themselves up. Those who wish to stay scantily clad are most welcome. Those who do not wish to remain scantily clad are welcome as well.Women did not have "freedom" in the ancient past. They were a part of culture which "forced" them to remain half clothed. Women are free "now". So this concept of "shame" stands no base in this discussion.Even in 18th century, Indian women favored comfort over cover. But now even above 40C we Indians cover ourselves as much as possible. How can we go back to the apparel freedom women had in antiquity? How can we remove the false concept of "shame"?
How Will Developing Countries Adapt to Massive Population Growth in the next Century?
How Will Developing Countries Adapt to Massive Population Growth in the next Century?
How will developing countries adapt to massive population growth in the next century?Well, at the moment they are in complete denial. Europe parrots the appalling policy rhetoric in Australia of 'securing our borders' but happily admits anyone with a lot of money or sometimes professional skills they are short of.They refuse to think ahead to the long term impact of climate change despite the responsibility they have for creating global warming and they are not prepared to help countries in Africa, Asia and Latin America struggling to deal with poverty, organised crime and a high birth rate due to the power of the Catholic Church. They happily sell weapons to countries busy fighting their neighbours but when young men and families flee the war zones, they shut their doors.There is little public awareness of population growth in Africa, despite people desperately heading north to Europe to try and build a future for themselves and their families, even when their own population is actually in decline and they need young people more than ever— — — — — —Why are degrees from high ranking universities needed to get jobs in Finance? Why can't those with degrees at universities in developing countries get finance jobs in the West?I can not answer your second question, as I have no idea if that is true. As to the first, not all finance jobs are the same. Some are far more prestigious than others, and the compensation, and therefore the risks, are far higher. As the compensation is far higher, they are far more competitive to get. One way to enhance your competitiveness is to come from an elite university.However, finance rewards performance above all else. I know great portfolio managers, for instance, who did not attend elite universities, but their performance justifies their compensation. I also know people who attended elite universities who were fired in a heartbeat, because their performance sucked.So, if you go to Harvard, Princeton or Stanford it is certainly going to help you get a job in finance, but it wo not help you keep it.— — — — — —Poor and developing countries such as Indonesia has abundance of sustainable & renewable energy like geothermal, hydro-power, solar, ocean thermal. Why do those governments maintain importing non-renewable fossil fuels to fulfill energy needs?Indonesia is rapidly developing. Some areas of Indonesia have deployed very advanced urban planning and alternative energy projects such as those in Bandung and West Java.The fossil fuel system is there to meet demand. The demand for low cost, high energy intensity, portable, stable fuels is very high. In contrast, newer fuels that are low energy, unreliable and not portable are very hard to introduce into the established system. Solar and wind also have to pay for new towers and solar farms first.Global north countries can often entertain a more progressive mandate for energy system change. This is because they can afford to invest in externalities like the climate. Indonesia has many other things to worry about in its political mandates.Nonetheless, policy change is under way in Indonesia. Indonesians are becoming more aware of their exposure to climate effects. These include, by 2060, 30 more deadly heatwave days a year and many parts of Indonesia over the habitable wet bulb temperature. That is, if little is done to reduce emissions. Indonesia is also exploring how to build low energy housing and low energy cooling.But returning to my initial observation: it's hard to quit fossil fuels! Each Global Northern person is using the equivalent of 5-10 kWh of electricity every hour of the day (24 hours a day, year round). This is consumed by transport, food and heating but also in the things people buy. This value might be 1 kWh per person per hour in Indonesia but you can see this is a lot of energy and it is in everything we do and consume. Renewables, clean and amazing as they are, cannot provide this sheer volume of energy.So with renewables comes deep changes in energy use. Those changes are hard. Poor and developing countries such as Indonesia has abundance of sustainable & renewable energy like geothermal, hydro-power, solar, ocean thermal. Why do those governments maintain importing non-renewable fossil fuels to fulfill energy needs?— — — — — —Projects in developing countriesBP Solar had many projects and co-operative activities in developing countries, including supplying power to 36,000 homes in rural Indonesia, installing 1000 solar devices to provide power to 400 remote villages in the Philippines, and setting up a rural electrification scheme in Malaysia to provide power to 30,000 remote homes in Sabah, Sarawak and Peninsular Malaysia. In the mid 1980s BP installed Solar power for Microwave repeater stations across Sierra Leone in support of a Telecommunications (Phone) network restoration.
Were Bookshops 'common' in the Late 19th Century, and How Did They Differ From Modern Ones?
Bookshops were certainly becoming more common in Victorian England. In fact, the entire printed world exploded in the 19th century. Most of it was concentrated in London, which by 1860 housed 812 booksellers, of whom 211 were also publishers.1 Edinburgh, the Scottish capital, was home to another 120 booksellers, with 30 also publishing. In contrast, the Universal British Directory listed only 988 booksellers for the entire country at the end of the 18th century.2At the same time, bookstores still had a long way to go. By the outbreak of the Second World War, there was four to five thousand booksellers operating within Great Britain.3 From one perspective then, bookstores were not "common" in Victorian Britain, at least not to the same extent that they would become in the 20th century.Nonetheless, by the later 19th century bookshops had broken into the mass consumer market. Historically, books had been prohibitively costly to own. This was still true up in the early 19th century. Books were still a low volume business; booksellers did not maintain much stocks but instead treated assisting clients in acquiring specific books as a core business.3 Even subscribers to private libraries, which were touted as a cheaper format for readers, were typically from the more prosperous elements of society.4From the middle of the century onward, however, readerships spread far and wide. While improved literacy played a part, important gains in that area were reached by the 18th century. Instead, most of the credit should go to the mass availability of low cost books.6 The Industrial Revolution was yielding dividends, and technological innovations such as better papermaking and printing techniques drastically lowered the cost of printed publications.Newspapers were the most widespread. With reduced publishing costs after the repeal of taxation on newspapers, they became affordable to even the lower class at merely a penny or two. Likewise, specialised periodicals catering to disparate tastes and demographic groups began to emerge.4 Apart from writings targeting the likes of farmers or homemakers, family friendly works such as those of Charles Dickens were also published in periodicals. These would often be read to the whole family by a literate member.Periodical literature supplemented but did not replace conventional books; indeed books became more accessible than ever. In the second half of the century, book prices fell precipitously thanks to increased competition between booksellers at the retail level.5 Decades of abortive attempts at price fixing finally broke down after 1852, and for the next few decades booksellers entered a period of intensive, unrestricted mutual undercutting.The destructive price war depressed profit margins and bankrupted many merchants, but also meant late Victorian readers could expect a substantial discount on the cover price of books. By the time retailers and publishers finally cooperated to enact the price-fixing Net Book Agreement of 1899, books were being read by far more people than ever before.(Vickers Publisher, Holywell Street. Artist unknown. Holywell Street was a notorious centre for pornographic publications before it was demolished to widen the Strand)(Daunt Books on the Marylebone High Street. An bookstore chain that recently also began publishing. Source)By the time of the late Victorian period, bookstores were already quite similar to contemporary ones. The intense price competition led to a diversification of a bookseller's business. Stationary, diaries, calendars, letters, art supplies, newspaper, periodicals, and greeting cards could all be found at in late 19th century bookstores.4 In other words, much like what you would expect in a modern shop.Like books, holiday greeting cards were originally priced as luxuries. Technical advances such as lithography allowed cards to be mass produced cheaply, making them accessible to the common people by the end of the century.References1. "The Book Trade." American Literary Gazette and Publishers' Circular (1864) 1.2. Dickinson, Harry Thomas, ed. A Companion to Eighteenth-Century Britain. John Wiley & Sons, 2008.3. Levy, Hermann. The Shops of Britain: a Study of Retail Distribution. Routledge, 2013.4. Graham, Kelley. Gone to the Shops: Shopping in Victorian England. Greenwood Publishing Group, 2008.5. Daunton, Martin. The Organisation of Knowledge in Victorian Britain. Oxford University Press, 2005.6. Perry, Karin. "Literacy and Technology: A Historical View." Technological Tools for the Literacy Classroom (2013)I've been reading a little bit about Victorian publishing bit I'm struggling to get a feel for how common and how similar Victorian bookstores in London would be.This is all I've read. It sounds like by about 1890 all you have of fiction in shops are thin serials, and in fact there's more libraries than shops. Is that true?How's common would a Victorian bookshop be? Would they stock modern size novels, or would they be more for scientific literature?
Theodor Moser Was a 19th Century Watch Maker. What Biographical Data Exists on This Person?
I found something but not much .... HIs watches were manufactured by the factory of "T. Moser & Co" His watches brightly reflected all canons of classical Swiss watch school. They were signed on the dial with "T.MOSER & Co". On his watxhes, he enhanced the power coming through the train, the center wheel is provided with a chaton jewel. The jewel of the central axis in chatons provides more equable transfer of effort. The jewel in chatons testifies to high level of the mechanism. Factory "Theodor Moser" conditionally was supposed as the competitor of Henry Moser factory (Hy Moser and Cie), and last struggled with competitors by the publication of various warnings about the differences between "real" Moser and "not true". Nevertheless, on practice, "T. Moser" existed and exhausted hours not worse, than Henry Moser. His watches are considered collectable.1. Why does Glenn BlecKKK despise Theodor Roosevelt, an accomplishe American president?Because Theodore Roosevelt marked the beginning of the poor and working class being used as slaves in America. Before Theodore Roosevelt, the monopolies owned everything and there was no upwards mobility for people that had to work for a living. People had to force their children in to sweat shops to help them feed their families because wages were so low for the average American. big businesses owned everything and controlled the government. Theodore Roosevelt realized how evil a system like that was. Republicans want it back. And they are getting it back on a global scale through trade deregulation. He also Hates FDR because it goes over real well to blame a Democrat for prolong the depression rather than blaming the cause, which was deregulation of the markets so risky investments could be insured by banks. SO when the stock market dropped insurance had to be paid out causing banks to collapse with many people losing their money in their accounts. This resulted in run on banks and banks closing their doors to prevent people from having access to their money. this was the reaon the Glass Steagall act was created. To prevent risky investments by banks. That was Repealed by Phil Gramm's bill when Republicans held control of congress in 1999, allowing credit default swaps and subprime derivatives to be issued without being regulated.2. Is 'Th.' in a name the short form of Theodor?In Germany, the degree Doctor theologiae is abbreviated as Dr. theol. Here, Th. abbreviates the given name of Dr. Gabler, which could be, for example3. What's your honest opinion on Romanian art and artists like Grigorescu, Brancusi, Guguianu, Theodor Aman, Adrian Ghenie, Tonitza, Corneliu Baba or Radu Belcin. Would you say that Romanians are as talented and gifted people as the Italians and French?Art is definitely in the eyes of the beholder, enjoying it depends on our capacity to absorb beauty in so various forms. And, ofcourse, it is a matter of taste. There's not really good or bad, beautiful or ugly, I think it's only sincere and artificial. Sure, there're famous or unknown artists, a status that can change suddenly and unexpectedly based on factors out of the artists control. So we usually rely on critics and connoisseurs to distinguish great artists from rubbish.Romania had and has famous art and famous artists. Some are anonymous, like many of the creators of medieval religious art, others are famous like the ones you listed in the question. I'm certain there're many valuable contemporary artists too, most of them unknown to us just like the famous ones remained often nameless to the masses back in their days.I doubt talent has ethnicity or nationality written on it. It can be influenced by environment, it can be recognized or wasted due to external factors, but true artists rarely had benefits from their countries and rarely enjoyed more than occasional help of their community or the protection of a wealthy sponsor. They always created valuable art but rarely enjoyed the benefits. As a matter of fact, a lot of valuable Romanian artists gained recognition outside the borders and some, like Brancusi, were rejected by thickheaded authorities even when they were already famous in their adoptive countries.Important is that we can enjoy now universal art everywhere, if we are wise enough to find beauty where it is. What is your honest opinion on Romanian art and artists like Grigorescu, Brancusi, Guguianu, Theodor Aman, Adrian Ghenie, Tonitza, Corneliu Baba or Radu Belcin. Would you say that Romanians are as talented and gifted people as the Italians and French?
What Was Normal Attire for Hindu Kings in the 15th Century?
South India has had a vast number of kingdoms , each having its own variety and having being influenced differently from other kingdoms , in culture , custorms , religion , art , language and of course the attire of all classes of society.So it's not wise to put them in one general basket called south india.Since it is not possible to quantitatively analyse all the kingdoms , let me consider a few notable dynasties that have reigned this region over a period of few centuries.Travellers like Ibn Battuta, Marco Polo and Abdur Razzaq give evidences in their accounts for the native non-Muslim kings wearing little to nothing at all.Yes to some extent, you are right , the south indian kings of the chola dynasty in the 12 to 14 century AD, did not clothe their upper body, as evident in the portrait of the famous Chola king Rajendra Chola IHere is a depiction of a King known as Cheraman Perumal from the Chera Dynasty , who were in power till the 12 century.So yes in short , certain Kings up to 13 - 14 Century AD , from various kingdoms, were bare chested , but in no way , "wearing little to nothing at all" , and in my opinion they were quite "properly" dressed .What about North Indian rulers? Were the Mauryan and Guptan rulers unused to clothes too?These kingdoms range roughly in the time period of 600 BCE to 100 BCE , little is recorded about the attire of kings during this period (or atleast whatever i could find was not sufficient).The Gupta king Kumaragupta I , depicted in the coin below , appears to be bare chested , and having a similar attire of his south Indian counterparts , centuries later.And below is the sculpture of the famous Mauryan King Ashoka , who according to me was one of the first indian king , to have a firm hold on all the Indian states , till the british conquered India , as a whole once again , after nearly 2000 years.The Attire of Ashoka , is similar to the Gupta kings , having no cloth on the upper body but having an elaborate neck ornament. For the first time India(the majority of it) has one single Emperor, this is a major opportunity , for the Indians to finally have a unified culture and tradition , this includes the attire. But the unified period is not long enough , to achieve this.How about the Vijayanagara kings and the Maratha kings, Shivaji and Shambhaji?Here is the portrait of King shivaji.By the time of 15 Century , all the kings of india , by now under the influence of the mughal emperors , and later under influence of portuguese , and the dutch , who were the first europeans to arrive before the french and english , had started to change their appearance , they wore dresses , which showed foreign influence , but which did not completely lose the traditional touch.Here is the statue of the famous king Krishnadevaraya , who ruled the prosperous Vijayanagara Empire , which encompasses , almost the entire region of south india.From this point on (till date) , almost all kings of both North/South India , had a similar outfit.Have a look at the present King (ceremonial only king) of Mysore.As it is visually clear that the 21st century royal attire has undergone only a certain number of changes from its 15 Century counterpart , preserving the overall basic structure.• Related QuestionsIs the reward for observing hijab in Iran the same as for observing hijab in Australia?Yes, indeed the reward is much higher; not only higher than people living in another place at the same time, but even higher than the companions doing a similar deed. The Prophet told us that the time will come when we feel estranged wherever we live, and that holding on to our identity and teachings of Islam will be as tough as someone grabbing (yes, grabbing, not just touching) a piece of charcoal. The reward, though, is fifty times that of the companions of the Prophet .The Prophet informed us that there will be a time (which we are living in now, or at least quickly approaching it) when Muslims will feel as estranged as they were during the early years of his message to Quraish:It is narrated on the authority of Abu Huraira that the Messenger of Allah () said: Islam initiated as something strange, and it would revert to its (old position) of being strange. so good tidings for the stranger. Sahih Muslim Book of Faith Hadith 145The Prophet gives good tidings to those who are estranged. Being estranged is not due to having fewer Muslims (now numbering well over one billion), but due to fewer Muslims properly following the teachings of Islam. In another narration of this hadith, the Prophet said: "They are a few righteous people among a lot of bad people." (Arabic: ). However, the Prophet gives good tidings to those who are strangers in their societies. See Islam Began as Something Strange on Islam Q&A for more information on this hadith.The good tidings are in the reward being fifty times that of the companions of the Prophet . Even the companions, when the Prophet told them so, they questioned him: fifty folds of people among ourselves or among the companions. This is under the condition that we comply with the teachings of Islam, enjoin what is right, and forbid what is wrong. Read:Narrated Abu Umayah Ash-Sha'bani: "I went to Abu Tha'balah Al-Khushani and said to him: 'How do you deal with this Ayah?' He said: 'Which Ayah?' I said: 'Allah's saying: Take care of yourselves! If you follow the guidance no harm shall come to you (5:105).' He said: 'Well, by Allah! I asked one well-informed about it, I asked the Messenger of Allah () about it.So he said: "Rather, comply with (and order) the good, and stay away from (and prohibit) the evil, until you see avarice obeyed, desires followed, and the world preferred, and everyone is amazed with his view. Then you should be worried about yourself in particular, and worry of the common folk. Ahead of you are the days in which patience is like holding onto an ember, for the doer (of righteous deeds) during them is the like of the reward of fifty of those who do the like of what you do." 'Abdullah bin Al-Mubarak said: "It was added for me, by other than 'Utbah, that it was said: 'O Messenger of Allah! The reward of fifty men among us, or them?' He said: 'No! Rather the reward of fifty men among you.'" Jami' at-Tirmidhi Hadith 3058For more information on this hadith, you may refer to The contrast between the deeds of the Sahaabah and the deeds of the people at the end of time on Islam Q&A.One final note, the fifty-fold reward is related to equivalent acts, not at large. We all know that there is no way for us now to reach the same level of support that the first companions gave to Islam and to the Prophet (effort, money, sacrifices, etc.). Also, we know that the best generation is that of the companions, then those who followed them, then those who followed them. In other words, those who hold onto an ember will get higher rewards than the companions per deed, but overall stance may not necessarily be as high.------Where is the best US fashion district (NYC, Chicago, LA, Miami, or ATL) to get wholesale clothing for my new clothing boutique? Who has bargains? Looking for men and women clothing, authentic brands and independent.From: Popular Wholesale Markets From New York to Los Angeles -Buying Wholesale Products From Merchandise Marts Throughout the CountryMerchandise Marts are very similar to malls in that you can go to one central location and get access to a variety of stores that sell merchandise. The only difference is that Merchandise Marts are geared specifically for the wholesale market.If you live in a major metropolitan city and want to find quality wholesale merchandise, then it's a good idea start by going to your local Merchandise Mart. These are excellent resources for wholesalers, retailers, or anyone else who sells products. All you need is a business tax ID and some money to spend. After that, you're on your way to wholesale business success. Check out the following list of the most popular Merchandise Marts throughout the country.Atlanta Apparel Mart for Men, Women and ChildrenAtlanta Merchandise Mart offers a wide variety of product categories. Also known as AmericasMart's Atlanta, categories include apparel, gifts, rugs, and items to meet the needs of any retail buyer. Chicago Merchandise MartThe Chicago Merchandise Mart offers an expansive amount of products including specialty gifts and home decor. Originally designed as a market center for trade professionals, it continues to cater to this audience today. Trade shows are also accessible to wholesale buyers and other registered attendees. Dallas Market CenterDallas Market Center offers a complete wholesale marketplace that features permanent showrooms and product lines from every imaginable category. Product categories include home décor, gifts, and apparel.Denver MartThe Denver Merchandise Mart is an 840,000 square foot facility that houses more than 3,500 lines, 450 permanent showrooms and includes categories such as gifts, resorts, collectibles, home furnishings, apparel, and accessories for women, men, and children. It also offers western apparel and equipment, souvenirs, gourmet food, decorative accessories, and carpeting.Los Angeles Fashion Market - California Market CenterThe California Market Center offers showrooms and event and creative space to the Los Angeles Fashion Market. Showrooms feature the most comprehensive collection of gifts, accessories, and furniture offerings. Massachusetts Northeast Market CenterThe Northeast Market Center is a 75,000 square foot facility housing 30 sales agency showroom suites and a gallery of salons. These outlets display over 1,000 gift and decorative accessory product lines available at wholesale to retailers.Miami Merchandise MartThe Miami Merchandise Mart is a professional wholesale market where showroom owners assemble collections from manufacturers in Europe, the Orient, Latin America, and the U. S. , and matches them up with the needs of buyers in Florida, the Caribbean, and Latin America. Over 10,000 professional buyers make multiple visits to this Mart each year.New York Market CenterThe New York Market Center is home to over 200 showrooms with product categories including home textiles, gifts, kitchenware, tabletop, furniture, toys, seasonal and general merchandise, architectural products, and art. Minneapolis MartThe Minneapolis Mart is a permanent wholesale showroom facility, featuring over 5,000 lines of home decor, accessory, and apparel merchandise in 140 showrooms.North Carolina High Point MarketThe High Point Market draws more than 75,000 people every 6 months and is the largest furnishings industry trade show in the world. The market features over 180 Buildings and 11. 5 million square feet of show space. San Francisco Design CenterThe San Francisco Design Center is comprised of 2 buildings-the Showplace and Galleria. Together they house over 100 beautifully curated showrooms representing over 2,000 manufacturers whose product lines are sourced locally and internationally.
What Are Some Ways to Keep My Hair Really Healthy?
What Are Some Ways to Keep My Hair Really Healthy?
Use professional shampoo & conditioner. I know it may seem like a rip-off, however all the shampoos like Pantene, Garnier, etc. have a high alcohol content....since the normal pH of your hair is 4.5-5.5, things containing high amounts of alcohol throw your hair all out of whack and cause breakage, split-ends, fly-aways, etc. The reason these shampoos make your hair feel soft is because they contain high amounts of humectants, which are just a cover for how damaging they really are! Another tip is ALWAYS use a thermal protector while applying heat. Heat appliances cause tons of damage to your hair. Usually this is a cream/clear gel you apply before blow drying. Never use a flat iron on hair that is not completely dry!1. Split End Help. ( 10 Points) !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!?For sure you should get a trim and maybe even cut your hair as short as you are comfortable doing it. You should for no reason straighten or dye your hair. Look for some Garnier Fructis or Pantene shampoos and conditioner for curly hair so that it extra moisturizes it and helps the split ends repair themselves. I say from experience that ppl with curly hair have really bad split ends, which is why we have special stuff in our hair products. The split ends wont magically go away in like a month or a few weeks, but you will see improvement after a while. Oh, and for sure DO NOT PICK THEM OFF!! It will just make it worse. Every two months until your hair is healthy get a trim. just maybe half an inch or an inch will be just fine. Eventually your hair will go back to normal. Good luck with that!.2. Whats the best shampoo conditioner for cheap?clever or V05 are solid inexpensive ($a million) shampoos, yet whilst it is composed of conditioner i could bypass Tresemme ($6) it does an somewhat solid interest. i take advantage of salon shampoo because of the fact i am form of a hair snob, yet I nonetheless use the cheap conditioner. Pantene is undesirable on your hair (too plenty protein and reasons alot of greater build up on the hair) so i does not bypass there. desire this permits! My hair is oily, superb, and colour-taken care of if that helps you any!3. How can I get my curly hair to be nice like Taylor Swift?Haha i have the same hair long and curly..but not pretty curly! im completely obsessed with taylor and her hair so i did so playing with it and what you really NEED to get is the conair hot sticks!! they are these little flexible curlers and they are not very expensive and i would look like a frizz ball without them!! you can like get them at walmart. anyways what i do when iwear my hair curly is like i get up and get in the shower and wash it and condition it and this may sound weird but dont use a whole lot of conditioner just enough to get it done cause it will help your hair hold the curl the just get out and towel dry your hair till it is just damp and then put a curling mouse in it and frizz serum then finish blow drying it straight! and you know have the curlers on like when your gettin in the shower and then just make sure the little light is on meaning that they are hot enough and then seperate your hair into pretty small peices (if you have really thick hair then you might need to buy two sets cause they only have 14 in them and you use small sections) and then start from the botom of your hair and role it through your hair and pin it together youll see the instructions on how to pin them together and make sure you wrap it all the way to the top of your head and leave them for like 15 or 20 minutes while your finishin gettin ready and then use like a light hairspray about 5 minutes before you take them out then your done. i know this thing was really long but its not that hard lol!!!! hope i helped good luck!!!!!!!!
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